Pottery dating mark

Have you ever wondered why some people turn every piece of pottery over and look at the bottom?

Maybe you thought they were emptying the contents or dusting the shop!

This is going to take the best part of a year to complete without anyone's help:( So please bear with me.

AT THE TIME THESE WERE THE THE ONLY WORKS OF ANY SIZE TO BE BUILT IN BURSLEM & DUE TO THE COMPANY OF W.

There are many different shades of "red" clay, but red and deep pink clays have been readily available to the potter for centuries, and this color often gives the glaze a different look than it would have with another color clay. For more information, see the book ALAMO POTTERY: A History of Alamo Pottery and its Offspring, Gilmer Pottery by N. Collins.) used a sandy clay for much of its dinnerware lines. This Heath bowl is clearly marked, but notice the clay color on the unglazed ring.

Any pottery that has been soaked in water may be beige, too, so beware of dirty bottoms!

According to a journal in 1893 the business was built on the site of a previous works founded in 1758.

It is not that any piece over a certain weight is American pottery–it is the relationship between the size and the weight that helps determine the country of origin.

If you pick up a piece of pottery and it has identifying marks such as a name or logo, you can easily determine the maker. This is a good place to start to identify the country of origin, if it is not shown.

So, just in the process of picking up the piece, the weight is registering in my mind.

The shape, glazing and markings of the "foot" or base surface of the piece which makes contact with a supporting surface (ie – table or shelf) can be as revealing as the color and texture of the clay.

used the wedge shapes routinely, so that is always my first guess on a piece with a dry wedge foot.

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